• The model viewer for your architectural designs: Solibri

    VisualARQ integrates IFC export to share models with other AEC applications

    VisualARQ integrates IFC export to share models with other AEC applications

    VisualARQ bets for Rhino for the design and generation of documentation for parametric and freeform architecture. If you want to combine their varied possibilities with other programs, you need a common language and a file viewer.

    IFC is the most common format and it is included in many developers’ software. You can transfer files with .IFC extension painlessly between your architectural software.

    When you work on a project, you exchange information with others: collaborators, partners, contractors or anyone assisting in any phase of the project. And, of course, not everyone will have the same software installed because the suppliers of materials or services use the software they believe is the most suitable to their activity. Here lies the real advantage of IFC, the fact the flow of information and the work on models are truly collaborative. It is a smooth and simple way of working, without errors or confusions that could result in delays or extra costs. You don’t need to interpret a design, you simply have to look at it.

    VisualARQ-Solibri-Model-Viewer

    VisualARQ and Solibri Model Viewer complement each other to share architectural projects. Image: solibri

    Since your models will be used by different people for different purposes, how can these people properly view them? Thanks to Solibri Model Viewer and its seamless integration with BIM.

    We at VisualARQ have tested Solibri and have included the process in our Youtube video channel. As you will see, it is very simple: it just takes 1 step to export a .IFC file from Rhino and VisualARQ to Solibri Model Viewer.

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  • How to manage floors and levels in architectural projects with Rhino

    Today we would like to introduce you one of the most useful and important features that VisualARQ adds to Rhino workflow when designing and modeling architectural projects: the Level Manager.

    Thanks to the Level Manager feature, in VisualARQ you can easily work on each level of your building projects.

    The Level Manager was added in the earliest releases of VisualARQ, however, it has experienced a considerable quality improvement since the last 1.8 version.

    The procedure is simple. The complexity is only brought by your imagination while you create. The Level Manager works as a control panel to create and modify new buildings and stories. This will greatly simplify your work and you can decide at any time if you want to see one or more levels and their characteristics. Each level puts a construction plane (working plane) at a specific elevation, which allows you to work easily on each level and quickly switch to the level on which you want to work.

    From the Level Manager, you can also control the Level visibility, as in Rhino layers. Simply turn the bulb lights on or off in the corresponding level. Each level has an invisible clipping plane at its bottom and top limits. If you wish, you can move the boundaries of a level using the “Top offset” and “Bottom offset” values.

    When a level is turned off, all the geometry located between its limits will be hidden, no matter what type of geometry it is: VisualARQ objects, surfaces and polysurfaces, meshes or 2D objects.

    This feature is really helpful to get incredible section views of the inside of the project and to work from there.

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  • RhinoBIM: first commercial release

    RhinoBIM

    Virtual Build Technologies announces the release of the commercial and educational versions of RhinoBIM. The current beta version 3.45.179 will expire February 28, 2015.

    RhinoBIM is a suite of plug-ins that enhances Rhino 5.0 for the Architectural, Engineering & Construction, Aerospace and Ship building Industries. Developed by Virtual Build Technologies. This first module now available includes:

    • Structural Design & Editor
    • Clash & Clear Analysis
    • Quantity take offs / BIM Reporter
    • IFC & CIS2 Translators
    • User Definable database

    View the User's Manual...

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  • Mestia Airport: architecture and creation of an identity

    VisualARQ analyzes a Rhino design: Queen Tamar Airport in Mestia, by J. Mayer H. Architects

    VisualARQ analyzes a Rhino design: Queen Tamar Airport in Mestia, by J. Mayer H. Architects

    VisualARQ features a Rhino architecture, a design by J. Meyer H that creates the identity of a city: Queen Tamar Airport in Mestia (Georgia).

    Despite of its size, the airport fulfils the UE requirements and includes 1,200m long take-off and landing tracks, a control tower, a check-in area and a boarding lounge for 25 people. The building measures 250 m² and it was completed in 3 months.

    A sophisticated black and white design for a unique airport.

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  • Win a Rhino and VisualARQ educational license with the DTF magazine contest

    DTF Magazine 660

    The Designing The Future magazine (DTF) is searching for the most innovative Diploma Thesis project.

    For that reason DTF has prepared a contest that will award the authors of the best projects in Spain based on the conceptual idea, the process, the software, the originality, the materials and the construction details.

    A VisualARQ educational license and a Rhino educational license will be some of the awards to the best projects. You can have a look at the prizes here.

    Inscription is free but only the students from spanish universities can participate in the contest. The inscription finishes the 6th of February and the results will be announced the 28th of February, during the DTF event in Palacio Cibeles of Madrid.

    Designing The Future is an architectural magazine aimed at students of architecture, architects and art & design lovers, that publishes a collection of the best Diploma Thesis Projects of students of architecture.

    Inscription and contest details, (in Spanish).

  • Residential building in Gdańsk

    Residential building in Gdansk created with Rhino and VisualARQ. Rendered with Maxell render.

    Residential building in Gdansk created with Rhino and VisualARQ. Rendered with Maxell render.

    Today we present a project of a residential building in Gdańsk, Poland, created by Skan studio architecture. The project is a good example of how VisualARQ and the VisualARQ Grasshopper Components were used for the different phases of the design process.

    The project features an apartment building with some commercial areas (shop and offices).

    Andrej Skalany, one of the main architects at Scan studio, explained that he made up a Grasshopper definition with some VisualARQ object components, such as walls, beams, columns and slabs which he used to find the best solution for the building framework. In his definition he created some grid reference lines and placed VisualARQ columns at intersection points. The grid and columns position moved dynamically according to the values given, while trying to find the best structural layout.

    VisualARQ Grasshopper Components were used to design the building framework.

    VisualARQ Grasshopper Components were used to design the building framework.

    Once the optimum values were found, all the Rhino and VisualARQ object components were baked to be further edited in Rhino. Once VisualARQ objects are baked, they become native VisualARQ objects in Rhino, so they keep their parametric properties. The project was further developed in cooperation with PlanWM office, who approved the Grasshopper definition according to the given parameters.

    VisualARQ Grasshopper Components were used to design the building framework.

    VisualARQ Grasshopper Components were used to design the building framework.

    Back in Rhino, some Rhino solids and other geometry were added to the model to finish the conceptual design process.

    All further 2D drawings were created in Rhino. VisualARQ helped to generate and calculate the areas of the building with the Space command.

    Andrej also appreciated the VisualARQ dynamic section tool and the option to hide and display levels with the Level Manager, not only for the ease of use but also to get interesting section views of the project.

    Building sectioned with the Level display parameters,using the VisualARQ Level Manager

    Building sectioned with the Level display parameters,using the VisualARQ Level Manager

    Images provided by Andrzej Skalany.

    Take a look at this project in the VisualARQ Gallery.

    Overview render of the residential building. Rendered with Maxwell render.

    Overview render of the residential building. Rendered with Maxwell render.

  • A Rhino project in the service of peace: the United States Institute of Peace

    VisualARQ analyzes a Rhino design: the United States Institute of Peace, by M. Safdie

    VisualARQ analyzes a Rhino design: the United States Institute of Peace, by M. Safdie

    VisualARQ presents an architectural design in the service of peace, modelled with Rhino software by M. Safdie: the United States Institute of Peace in Washington.

    The main characteristics of the building are its roof and its two atria. The undulating design of the roof and the light cantilevers evoke a universal symbol for “peace”, the purpose of the institution hosted in the building. Each 23m high atrium is covered by translucent glass panels. The shapes of the metal support are curved but the panels themselves are flat. This design effect has been achieved after a careful calculation of the structures with the appropriate software.

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  • Trick to split a beam in different parts

    There is no command in VisualARQ to split a beam in different parts. However, there is a trick to achieve that using a simple Grasshopper definition with VisualARQ Grasshopper Components.

    (You need to have Grasshopper and VisualARQ Grasshopper Components installed).

    Steps:

    1. Type "Grasshopper" in the command line to launch Grasshopper.
    2. Open the "Beam Split.gh" definition from Grasshopper.
    3. Right-click on the Beam Param component to assign the VisualARQ beam to the model you want to split.
    4. Define the number of parts you want to split the beam in.
    5. Bake the Beam component. To do it, right-click on the Beam component and select the "Bake" option. This operation will turn the beam preview into workable beams in VisualARQ.
    6. In Rhino, delete the original beam.

    The definition simply obtains the path curve of the selected beam, breaks it into different segments, and creates new beams with the resulting segments.

    The same definition can be used for VisualARQ walls, curtain walls and railings, replacing the Beam components by the corresponding object type components.

    Beam split post

  • Rhino, Grasshopper and Python manuals in Spanish

    Grasshopper for beginners and intermediate users de archiologics 500 - adolfo Nadal
    Adolfo Nadal, Founder and Principal of archi[o]logics, is a professional with a manifold career in architecture, education, design, and computational geometry.

    Adolfo has been kind enough to share his manuals on Computational Design (in Spanish) on issuu.

    The Rhino, Grasshopper and Python manuals are aimed to begginer and intermediate users:

    Source: Rhino blog.

  • Architecture with Rhino that transforms waste into profits

    A landfill, architecture that transforms waste into profits

    A landfill, architecture that transforms waste into profits. Image: Juliana Vargas

    The project we are presenting today is the graduation project of the young Costa Rican architect Juliana Vargas, who used Rhino and VisualARQ as the main tools to develop it.

    The project focuses on the recovery system of a landfill area and shows how a potentially degraded and marginalized area was transformed into a beneficial area for the community.

    Have a look at Juliana’s project and get to know how Rhino and VisualARQ helped her develop it.

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